Tjimba people

Tjimba

Tjimba / Cimba

The Cimba, also spelled Tjimba, are a remote, Herero-speaking hunter-gatherer people of the Kaokoveld desert in northwest Namibia and southwest Angola, in the mountain ranges bordering the Kunene River. They continue to use stone tools, and use Adenium boehmianum to poison their arrows.

Their Herero neighbors portray them as Herero who have lost their cattle and are therefore impoverished, but they are a distinct people, both culturally and physically. Indeed, physically they seem to be a remnant of an indigenous population of a southern African type—along with the Kwadi, the Kwisi, and the Damara—that are unlike either the San (Bushmen) or the Bantu Herero. The mitochondrial DNA of Tjimba who have been genetically tested is similar to that of Himba, Herero, and Damara, suggesting that they descend (at least maternally) from the same Bantu ancestors.

 
Population & Ecosystem

Remote hunter-gatherer people living in the mountain ranges bordering the Cunene River.

 
Economy & Society

Hunter gatherers. They continue to use stone tools, and use Adenium boehmianum to poison their arrows. Tjimba are organised in small bands composed of around 20-30 members lead by elderly men and women.

 
Culture & Religion

Tjimba speak Herero language.

Their Himba and Muhakaona neighbours portray them as Herero who have lost their cattle and are therefore impoverished, but they are a distinct people, both culturally and physically. Indeed, physically they seem to be a remnant of an indigenous population of a southern African type - along with the Cuepe and Mucuis -.

The mitochondrial DNA of Tjimba who have been genetically tested is similar to that of Himba, suggesting that they descend (at least maternally) from the same Bantu ancestors.

 

Sources: